Poetry Friday: Process for I Come From Poems

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Thanks to Sylvia at Poetry for Children who is hosting today. She has a teacher rarified Sneak Peek of the 2019 poetry titles.

DISCLAIMER: I usually am teaching poetry lessons with a limited time amount. It may be thirty minutes or forty-five minutes. And as when I was in the library, I had to do over several weeks. If I were teaching in a regular classroom, I would probably teach in a different way.

I’ve been thinking about my process for working with students with creating poetry. A lot of times, I’m a “pantser” (versus being a planner). So last month I had an opportunity to work with two third grade classes on a more complicated version of the “I Come From” poems that George Ella Lyons has offered to the world. If you search on the Internet, you will find a variety of templates to use.

I decided to adapt a template into a format that I have used with students for a several poetry forms.

The first week I subbed in December, I used this form after sharing a lot of examples (particularly ones that I’ve shared in earlier blog posts).

At the end of writing time, I gathered them up so that I could type their drafts (if I were in a classroom full time, I would probably have them type them).

When I returned the second week, I handed out the drafts. I shared from my own experience in submitting poems that I get to look at the draft and the “editor” suggestions. I had them reread and make changes.

I met with these two boys and they shared what they wanted. Students got to choose which lines they wanted to use.

On this second class, I offered this for those who wanted to write their poem.
Nathan reread his draft and decided that he wanted to revise in a big way by using the above format.

He was so pleased with the outcome.

To showcase the class poems, I’m in the process of creating a Padlet for their work.

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Poetry Friday: Sneak Peak at Soaring Earth by Margarita Engle

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Thank you Carol W. at Carol’s Corner for hosting today’s Poetry Friday. A couple weeks ago, I was lucky enough to have Margarita Engle send me an ARC of SOARING EARTH. This is the companion memoir to ENCHANTED AIR.

Now if you haven’t read ENCHANTED AIR yet, stop by your local library and borrow it. It was nominated for a CYBILs Poetry Award in 2015.

SOARING EARTH continues as Engle begins high school just as the social issues: Civil Rights, the Vietnam War, environmental concerns are heating up. In Engle’s lyrical language, she paints a landscape of what it’s like for a teen during the late 60’s.

Despite not being allow to travel to Cuba (thanks to the revolution there), Margarita finds other way to spread her wings through friends, writing and education.

Readers of both books are in for a treat of rich and delicious language. It’s sure to make your spirit soar.

Available in the world in February. Give youself the Valentine of a book and purchase a copy or make sure your local library has it in their collection.

Title: SOARING EARTH
Author: Margarita Engle
Illustrator:
Published: Available, February 2019
Pages: 192
Reading Level: 7th gr and beyond
Publisher: Atheneum Books for Young Readers
ISBN: 9781534429536
Source: ARC sent to me by the author

The ARC I have is available for the next reader. If you’d like to read it and share the love, leave a comment and I’ll draw a name next week.

Poetry Friday: Voices in the Air by Naomi Shihab Nye

IMG_1077Thanks to Irene at Live Your Poem for hosting Poetry Friday this week.

This week, I want to show case the title I nominated for the CYBILS Poetry Awaed:  VOICES IN THE AIR, POEMS FOR LISTENERS by Naomi Shihab Nye.  If you have read my blog for any length of time, you know that I consider her a mentor.  Last April, I attended the 2018 May Hill Arbuthnot Honor Lecture given by Naomi Shihab Nye.   I, of course, bought her latest book.

What if we were the listeners of all the voices in the air? Those who came before us or those we have yet to meet? What if we took the time to listen? What would we notice?

VOICES is divided into three sections: Messages, Voices in the Air, and More Worlds.

Nye begins with an introduction, a pondering of making sense of the strange world we currently reside in with a quote by Galway Kinnell, “To me, poetry is someone standing up to speak, and saying, with as little concealment as possible, what it is for him or her to be on earth at this moment.”

She reflects on a conversation student at the Yokohama International School in Japan. She said listening and writing poetry give us more yutori– a place to stand back to contemplate what we are living and experiencing…more spaciousness in being and more room to listen. I love this!

This ninety-five poem collection is contemplative and we should listen to one another read these poems aloud. Many of the poems were written for specific people. At the end of the book, Nye includes Biographical Notes.

We should take the time to slow down and listen.

Some of my favorite poems in this collection include: “Twilight”, “Train Across Texas”, and “Where do Poets Find Images, and For the Birds”.

Here’s the first few lines of perhaps my favorite (I’m not sure I can really choose)

Reserved for Poets
(Signs on first rows of chairs at poetry festival. La Conner, Washington)

Sunsets.

Trouble.

Full moons.

No really–they’re everybody’s.

Nothing is reserved.

I highly encourage to find this book, read it, and listen.

Title: VOICES IN THE AIR, POEMS FOR LISTENERS
Author: Naomi Shihab Nye
Illustrator:
Published: 2018
Pages: 190
Reading Level: YA
Publisher: Greenwillow
ISBN: 978-0-06-269184-2
Source: Personal purchase

Poetry Friday: Second Installment of “I Come From” Poems

Thank you to Laura at Writing the World for Kids for hosting Poetry Friday this week.

This is the second of three Poetry Fridays featuring a second grade class and their “I Come From” poems inspired from the work of George Ella Lyon.

I Come From

I come from either Utah or Oregon. I don’t know.

I hear my mom and my dad

I see cats in the sky

I want a Beyblade set

I come from either Utah or Oregon. I don’t know.

I worry about my family

I cry to get to go to Utah

I say Mom, can I get a new game

I try to do football

I hope I won’t get hurt

I come from either Utah or Oregon. I don’t know.

By Nathan, 2nd grade

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I Come From

I come from the stars in the sky

I wonder if the world can be a better place

I hear laughter every day

I see people playing

I want to play

I come from the stars in the sky

I pretend I’m a princess

I touch the sky

I worry if I will fall out of the sky

I cry out candy

I come from the stars in the sky

I understand the world

I say I love you to my mom and dad

I dream big

I try to be a good friend

I hope that homeless people get food

I come from the stars in the sky

By Hailee, 2nd grade

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I Come From

I come from the sky

I wonder where is God

I hear you

I see dogs barking

I want an apple

I come from the sky

I pretend to be cool

I touch dogs

I worry about a house fire

I cry Mom

I come from the sky

I understand books

I say to my mom I love you

I dream to fly

I try to be good

I hope to be silly

I come from the sky

By Brooke, 2nd grade

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I Come From

I come from Disneyland

I wonder when Mickey Mouse was created

I hear creaking

I see Mickey Mouse

I come from Disneyland

I touch a teddy bear

I worry about flames

I understand my sister

I come from Disneyland

By Lindsey, 2nd grade

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Poetry Friday: Student Work

IMG_1077Thanks to Tabatha at The Opposite of Indifference for hosting Poetry Friday this week.

I’m not sure if this blog will continue on a continuous basis.  However, until I can work out the details of a new platform, and when I have student work to showcase, posts will happen.

I got to sub in a second grade last Friday and in the afternoon this past Tuesday.  We were able to create poetry.  We started with the Janet Wong poem, “Great Morning” last Friday.

On Tuesday, we wrote “I Come From” poems based on the work of George Ella Lyon.  I shared some of the student poems and my own poem, “I Come From”.

Then we brainstormed our ideas for our hopes, worries, wishes, understandings, and more. We talked about the idea of “I come from…” being a repetitive line.

I had a scaffolded template for the class to use.  It’s the beginning of the year for these second graders and I wanted them to feel sucessful.  Also just by chance, they could fold the paper and work in chunks.  I also gave them the option to choose the lines they would answer.  As the editor, I am in charge of typing them.

After the last recess of the day, they wanted to read their poems a loud. What a joy.

Over the next three weeks, please enjoy these poems.

I Come From

I  come from Mickey Mouse

I wonder if my house is going to burn

I hear my brother crying every day

I see Mickey Mouse

I want to go to Hawaii

I  come from Mickey Mouse

I pretend to be a princess

I touch my head

I worry about my family

I cry about clocks

I  come from Mickey Mouse

I understand my brother

I say kind words to people.

I dream big

I try to help the poor

I hope I can be a doctor

I  come from Mickey Mouse

By Sari, 2nd grade

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I Come From

I  come from Washington

I wonder where unicorns come from

I hear people texting

I see my mom and my dad and my brother, Jeremy

I want a unicorn

I  come from Washington

I pretend I’m a princess

I touch my mommy

I worry I will catch on fire

I cry when my dog gets sugar

I  come from Washington

I understand that my mom says no.

I say I love you

I dream about unicorns

I try to help the poor

I hope that I am a princess

I  come from Washington

By Abbie, 2nd grade

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I Come From

I  come from the Civil War

I wonder about LeBron James

I hear dogs barking

I see a dog

I want a fox

I  come from the Civil War

I pretend I’m a lion

I touch dogs

I cry when I’m happy

I  come from the Civil War

By Damion, 2nd grade

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I Come From

I  come from Disneyland and books

I wonder if unicorns are real

I hear dogs barking in the night

I see a classroom and music

I want lots of toys and stuffies

I  come from Disneyland and books

I pretend to b a princess

I touch my fluffy dog at night

I worry that I will get robbed

I cry for my dog at night

I  come from Disneyland and books

I understand my sister and my mom

I say stop it and yes, please

I dream of unicorns and mermaids

I try to climb really tall mountains

I hope that I get lots of toys

I  come from Disneyland and books

By Madyson, 2nd grade

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I Come From

I  come from nature

I hear birds

I see frogs

I want Legos

I  come from nature

I pretend to fly

I touch armadillos

I cry that the baby is hurt

I  come from nature

By Jaymen, 2nd grade

 

Poetry Friday: Flashlight Night

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Thank you, Matt, at Radio, Rhythm & Rhyme, for hosting Poetry Friday. And happy almost book birthday to FLASHLIGHT NIGHT.

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One of the nicest things waiting for me at school in August was a galley proof of Matt’s book.  Besides getting a sneak peek, I love that I can show students as part of the book making and publishing process.

Today, I shared with Mrs. L’s second-grade class.  There were lots of “oohs” and “aahs” over the words and illustrations.  Here are some comments:

‘The fence looks like the zombie apocalypse.” ~ Carter

“The cat is also the tiger.” ~ Amy

“It looks like a haunted house with the crooked fence.” ~Chase

“You can imagine things that aren’t real.” ~Lani

The author wants you to imagine”. ~Naomi

“I like to play hand puppets with a flashlight.” ~Morgan

I can’t wait to get the finished copy when it arrives on the shelves.  I absolutely love the work play and rhymes.

And Fred Koehler’s muted tones of the book makes you want to pour over the drawings for awhile.

Congratulations, Matt, for a stunning first book.  It’s going to be fun to compare the galley proof with the actual book.

 

Poetry Friday: Firefly by Jacqueline Woodson

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Thanks to Heidi at Heidi at My Juicy Little Universe. for hosting Poetry Friday.

My niece moved to NYC last August.  She introduced her son to fireflies last week.  They are such magical creatures.  Hereś a Jacqueline Woodson poem.

Firefly

BY  JACQUELINE WOODSON

It’s almost May
and yesterday
I saw a firefly.
You don’t see
them a lot
in the city.
Sometimes
in the park
in the near dark
The rest of the poem is HERE.
Check It Out is going on a summer break until August.