Poetry Friday: Second Installment of “I Come From” Poems

Thank you to Laura at Writing the World for Kids for hosting Poetry Friday this week.

This is the second of three Poetry Fridays featuring a second grade class and their “I Come From” poems inspired from the work of George Ella Lyon.

I Come From

I come from either Utah or Oregon. I don’t know.

I hear my mom and my dad

I see cats in the sky

I want a Beyblade set

I come from either Utah or Oregon. I don’t know.

I worry about my family

I cry to get to go to Utah

I say Mom, can I get a new game

I try to do football

I hope I won’t get hurt

I come from either Utah or Oregon. I don’t know.

By Nathan, 2nd grade

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

I Come From

I come from the stars in the sky

I wonder if the world can be a better place

I hear laughter every day

I see people playing

I want to play

I come from the stars in the sky

I pretend I’m a princess

I touch the sky

I worry if I will fall out of the sky

I cry out candy

I come from the stars in the sky

I understand the world

I say I love you to my mom and dad

I dream big

I try to be a good friend

I hope that homeless people get food

I come from the stars in the sky

By Hailee, 2nd grade

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

I Come From

I come from the sky

I wonder where is God

I hear you

I see dogs barking

I want an apple

I come from the sky

I pretend to be cool

I touch dogs

I worry about a house fire

I cry Mom

I come from the sky

I understand books

I say to my mom I love you

I dream to fly

I try to be good

I hope to be silly

I come from the sky

By Brooke, 2nd grade

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

I Come From

I come from Disneyland

I wonder when Mickey Mouse was created

I hear creaking

I see Mickey Mouse

I come from Disneyland

I touch a teddy bear

I worry about flames

I understand my sister

I come from Disneyland

By Lindsey, 2nd grade

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Advertisements

Poetry Friday: Student Work

IMG_1077Thanks to Tabatha at The Opposite of Indifference for hosting Poetry Friday this week.

I’m not sure if this blog will continue on a continuous basis.  However, until I can work out the details of a new platform, and when I have student work to showcase, posts will happen.

I got to sub in a second grade last Friday and in the afternoon this past Tuesday.  We were able to create poetry.  We started with the Janet Wong poem, “Great Morning” last Friday.

On Tuesday, we wrote “I Come From” poems based on the work of George Ella Lyon.  I shared some of the student poems and my own poem, “I Come From”.

Then we brainstormed our ideas for our hopes, worries, wishes, understandings, and more. We talked about the idea of “I come from…” being a repetitive line.

I had a scaffolded template for the class to use.  It’s the beginning of the year for these second graders and I wanted them to feel sucessful.  Also just by chance, they could fold the paper and work in chunks.  I also gave them the option to choose the lines they would answer.  As the editor, I am in charge of typing them.

After the last recess of the day, they wanted to read their poems a loud. What a joy.

Over the next three weeks, please enjoy these poems.

I Come From

I  come from Mickey Mouse

I wonder if my house is going to burn

I hear my brother crying every day

I see Mickey Mouse

I want to go to Hawaii

I  come from Mickey Mouse

I pretend to be a princess

I touch my head

I worry about my family

I cry about clocks

I  come from Mickey Mouse

I understand my brother

I say kind words to people.

I dream big

I try to help the poor

I hope I can be a doctor

I  come from Mickey Mouse

By Sari, 2nd grade

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

I Come From

I  come from Washington

I wonder where unicorns come from

I hear people texting

I see my mom and my dad and my brother, Jeremy

I want a unicorn

I  come from Washington

I pretend I’m a princess

I touch my mommy

I worry I will catch on fire

I cry when my dog gets sugar

I  come from Washington

I understand that my mom says no.

I say I love you

I dream about unicorns

I try to help the poor

I hope that I am a princess

I  come from Washington

By Abbie, 2nd grade

++++++++++++++++++++++++++

I Come From

I  come from the Civil War

I wonder about LeBron James

I hear dogs barking

I see a dog

I want a fox

I  come from the Civil War

I pretend I’m a lion

I touch dogs

I cry when I’m happy

I  come from the Civil War

By Damion, 2nd grade

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

I Come From

I  come from Disneyland and books

I wonder if unicorns are real

I hear dogs barking in the night

I see a classroom and music

I want lots of toys and stuffies

I  come from Disneyland and books

I pretend to b a princess

I touch my fluffy dog at night

I worry that I will get robbed

I cry for my dog at night

I  come from Disneyland and books

I understand my sister and my mom

I say stop it and yes, please

I dream of unicorns and mermaids

I try to climb really tall mountains

I hope that I get lots of toys

I  come from Disneyland and books

By Madyson, 2nd grade

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

I Come From

I  come from nature

I hear birds

I see frogs

I want Legos

I  come from nature

I pretend to fly

I touch armadillos

I cry that the baby is hurt

I  come from nature

By Jaymen, 2nd grade

 

Poetry Friday: CYBILS Poetry Finalists

:IMG_1077

Thank you to Linda at Teacher Dance for hosting Poetry Friday.

ICYMI: On Sunday, January 1, 2017, the CYBILS’ finalists for Poetry were announced. 

I must tell you that this was perhaps one of the most difficult years to whittle forty titles in Poetry down to seven finalists.  There were SO many great books. So, so many.  I am proud of our committee: Joy Acey, Linda Baie, Carol Wilcox, Kortney Garrison, Sylvia Vardell, and Tricia Stohr-Hunt.  We came to consensus on the list that represents diversity and something for all ages.

And here are the finalists:

Booked
by Kwame Alexander
HMH Books for Young Readers
Nominated by: PragmaticMom

Nick Hall is a typical eighth grader who loves soccer and hates school. Unfortunately, he has a father who is a linguistics professor afflicted with chronic verbomania.* Nick’s father loves words so much that he has written a dictionary, Weird and Wonderful Words, which he is forcing Nick to read, one letter at a time. And of course, his father is much more interested in developing his son’s cognitive abilities than in supporting Nick’s passion for soccer.

Most of Nick’s problems are typical middle school dilemmas– boring classes, budding interest in a girl, and dealing with the school bullies, twins who steal Nick’s bike. And of course the book has a couple of caring adults- one of whom happens to be a former Grammy-winning rapper turned school librarian, Mr. MacDonald. Nick’s life takes an unexpected turn when his parents inform him they are separating and his mother is moving out of state to return to her first love, training horses.

What’s not typical about this book are Kwame Alexander’s poems. Alexander uses a variety of poetic forms- including free verse, acrostics, found poems, and many others. And thanks to Nick’s father, there’s tons of interesting and unusual vocabulary- codswalloped, limerence, cacchinate, to name a few.

A novel-in-verse that’s sure to engage even the most reluctant reader.

*a love of words

Carol Wilcox, Carol’s Corner

Fresh Delicious
by Irene Latham, illustrated by Mique Moriuchi
Wordsong
Nominated by: Linda Baie

Irene Latham’s poems and Mique Moriuchi’s illustrations bring to the reader one of the colorful pleasures of summer in this “fresh” and “delicious” poetry. Here we go into the farmer’s market, baskets on our arms. They might be filled with “a fleet of green submarines” (cucumbers), ” a “mountain of mice-sized swords” (okra) or “rows upon rows/of tiny noses” (corn on the cob). The poems open the senses to new ideas about fruits and vegetables found. They are mouth-watering to imagine through the words, with illustrations that show the animals shopping in the happiest of ways. In the poem Wild Honey, Irene writes that it makes “our tongues/buzz/with pleasure.” In this book of poetry, readers will do the same. Irene also shares recipes after the market shopping, just right for kids to help with the cooking.

Linda Baie, Teacher Dance

Garvey’s Choice
by Nikki Grimes
Wordsong
Nominated by: MissRumphius

A middle grade verse novel that strikes at the heart of early adolescent angst, Grimes has given us a heartfelt, realistic portrayal of what it means for a young person to navigate school, friendships and family life. Garvey, who is overweight and not the athlete his father hoped he would be, has dreams of his own. Written in tanka, Grimes’ short verses pack an emotional punch, sharing the highs and lows of Garvey’s journey to figure out who he is, while simultaneously making himself happy and his father proud. Father and son eventually find that connection, and I dare you not to tear up when they do. Grimes has a gift for getting to the heart of middle school angst and gives readers a boy they will love and won’t soon forget.

Tricia Stohr-Hunt, The Miss Rumphius Effect

Guess Who, Haiku
by Deanna Caswell, illustrated by Bob Shea
Harry N Abrams
Nominated by: Kortney Garrison

Guess Who, Haiku by Deanna Caswell is a fun introduction to the puzzle of poetry. Each spread presents a farm animal’s poem–a riddle in haiku form–on bright pages with simple, engaging illustrations by Bob Shea.

The familiar barnyard animals and the rhythm and rhyme of the repeating lines make this an excellent read-aloud. It’s the perfect book for groups of mixed age children at library storytime or at home. The youngest children will enjoy the riddles while older children will want to take up the writing challenge.

Deanna Caswell plays with language, and then invites her readers to join the fun! The delightful end matter continues the game and helps to answer the last, most surprising riddle of all.

Kotney Garrison, One Deep Drawer

The Last Fifth Grade of Emerson Elementary
by Laura Shovan
Wendy Lamb Books
Nominated by: Adrienne Gillespie

A teacher and her students work together to try to save their school from demolition in this novel in verse snapshot of one fifth grade class across a whole school year. Ms. Hill’s class of 18 students includes a mix of boys and girls, twins, Spanish speakers, children from a variety of cultural backgrounds, shy kids, leaders, friends, “frenemies,” all trying to express themselves through poetry. Each poem reflects an individual point of view that changes and grows over the year contributing to a complete narrative detailing their classroom dynamics as well as their struggle to take an active stand for their school. Shovan effectively employs 17 different forms of poems throughout this novel in verse including acrostic, concrete, diamante, epistolary, fib, found, free verse, haiku, limerick, list, narrative, ode, rap, rhyming, senryu, sonnet and tanka poems. This is an engaging school-based story in poems that can inspire young readers to become activists in their communities and to consider writing poetry as a vehicle for achieving some of their goals.

Sylvia Vardell, Poetry for Children

To Stay Alive: Mary Ann Graves and the Tragic Journey of the Donner Party
by Skila Brown
Candlewick Press
Nominated by: Jonemac

Donner Party. This ill-fated party began their westward journey from Illinois to California in the spring of 1846. An ill advised detour proves deadly as less than half of the party actually survived.
Through the eyes of 19-year-old, Mary Ann Graves, readers travel on the trail with her family.
Skila’s poems match the mood of the party. In the beginning, they are light with a quick tempo. But as the travel slows, challenges surface along with danger, and so does the cadence and tone of Mary Ann’s voice. Readers are with her during that ominous snowstorm. when the entire party takes shelter and are forced into cannibalism to survive.
Skila captures a compelling story of adventure, despair and survival that readers will want to read again and again.

Jone Rush MacCulloch, Check It Out

When Green Becomes Tomatoes: Poems for All Seasons
by Julie Fogliano, illustrated by  Julie Morstad
Roaring Brook Press
Nominated by: Sara Ralph

When Green Becomes Tomatoes Poems for All Seasons by Julie Fogliano gently leads the reader through a year’s worth of journal entry poems to celebrate the seasons. Written without capitalization or punctuation, the poems take advantage of caesuras and spacing on the page to draw the reader through the poems. There is a Zen like/haiku feeling of discovery in the short poems.

These poems frolic in nature and provide fresh language for young ones just learning language and for jaded old timers who need new ways of seeing and discovering their environment.

Joy Acey, Poetry for Kids Joy

Stay tuned and wait for Valentine’s Day when our winner is revealed.  Until then I will be featuring books that were on my shortlist but were left behind.

Happy Friday.

Happy Poetry.

Poetry Friday: Found Word Poem

IMG_1077

Thanks to Julianne for hosting Poetry Friday today.

Last week, I shared a Found Word poem from Joy.  She sent me an envelope of words.

20160812_144033

Today I created a word poem which is also a statement about my re-visioning my verse novel.  Verse Novel and I have been on a sabbatical.  I have been processing so much in my head about it.

20160812_144805

As you can tell, Joy provided many words so I can create more word poems.

Please Put This on Your Radar

It’s almost time to apply to be a CYBILS judge.  This usually happens toward the end of August.  Always in great need for poetry people who are passionate about poetry.

The chair people are already discussing and planning for this year’s awards.  Stay tuned.

Happy Friday.

Happy Poetry.

Poetry Friday: CYBILS Poetry Finalists Announced

/home/wpcom/public_html/wp-content/blogs.dir/430/10015719/files/2015/01/img_1077.jpg
Welcome to the first Poetry Friday of 2015. It’s hosted by Tricia at The Miss Rumphius Effect and one of our panelist for the first round of the CYBILS in Poetry. The seven member committee worked diligently to come up with the spectacular seven books. They are diverse, varied in audiences and stretch boundaries.

And with out further ado here they are (again) in case you were away from the computer or the digital highway.

Brown Girl Dreaming
by Jacqueline Woodson
Nancy Paulsen Books
Nominated by: Deb Nance at Readerbuzz
Brown Girl Dreaming is many things in one rich collection – memoir, history, biography – and lyrical, exquisite poetry. Events of the author’s personal and family history provide the framework for a series of individual poems. Woven throughout are key events of the Civil Rights journey and also personal effects of racism and discrimination. In this beautiful and powerful tapestry of verse, one hears the poignant reflections of Jacqueline Woodson, one of today’s finest writers, who kept on dreaming through tough times and good times and who keeps on writing in mesmerizing verse.

Nancy Bo Flood , The Pirate Tree; Social Justice and Children’s Literature

Dear Wandering Wildebeest And Other Poems from the Water Hole
by Irene Latham, illustrated by Anna Wadham
Millbrook Press
Nominated by: Amy @ Hope Is the Word
Dear Wandering Wildebeest’s poetry bounces with the impala and peeps like the meerkat. With childlike illustrations by Anna Wadham, Irene Latham takes us on a journey to the water hole of the African grasslands. Each poem is accompanied with factual information that will inform even the oldest readers.

To All the Beasts who Enter Here, there is word play with “Saw-scaled viper/ rubs, shrugs,/ sizzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzles,” form experiments in Triptych for a Thirsty Giraffe, humor with “Dung Beetle lays eggs/ in elephant poop,” and even danger, “Siren-howls/ foul the air./ Vultures stick to task.” Children and adults alike will love the language and learning that wanders in this book along with the animals of the watering hole.

Margaret Simon, Reflections on the Teche

Firefly July: A Year of Very Short Poems
by Paul B. Janeczko
Candlewick Press
Nominated by: Danyelle
Prolific anthologist Paul B. Janeczko brings the old and the new together in Firefly July: A Year of Very Short Poems. The collection of 36 poems contains poems by classic poets such as Emily Dickinson and Robert Frost. Intermingled with these are poems by well known children’s poets including J. Patrick Lewis and X. J. Kennedy. Firefly July takes readers through the seasons beginning in spring and ending with winter. The poems take readers to different locations as well. Both city and country settings appear in the poems. As the subtitle states, the poems are short, but the images they evoke are almost tangible. Melissa Sweet’s mixed media illustrations are colorful, playful, imaginative, and whimsical. They draw readers into the poems. Firefly July is a stellar collection that will likely be a family favorite for years to come.

Bridget R. Wilson, What Is Bridget Reading?

Hi, Koo!: A Year of Seasons
by Jon J Muth
Scholastic
Nominated by: Bridget Wilson
Inspired by his twins, Muth wrote a haiku book that doesn’t followe the often used three line, 5-7-5 syllable form. This made this title a stand out among other haiku books.
Readers take a seasonal journey from summer through spring by Koo the panda. (Thus the pun in the title: Hi Koo!) Beginning with a simple observation about the wind: /found!/ in my Coat pocket a missing button/ the wind’s surprise, to the last haiku: becoming quiet/ Zero sound/ only breath/ Muth offers to young readers a new way to experience haiku.
The watercolor and ink drawings complement the text. The subtle alphabet theme adds another dimension to the book.
The author’s note at the book’s beginning sets the tone: “…haiku is like an instant captured in words–using sensory images. At its best, a haiku embodies a moment of emotion that reminds us that our own human nature is not separate from all of nature.”
This book of poetry will help readers to slow down to appreciate the small moments of nature and daily happenings.

Jone Rush MacCulloch, Check It Out

Santa Clauses: Short Poems from the North Pole (Carolrhoda Picture Books) (Junior Library Guild Selection)
by Bob Raczka
Carolrhoda Books
Nominated by: Stephanie Whelan
Who knew that among his many talents, Santa was an expert at writing haiku? In this collection of 25 poems using the 5-7-5 format, Raczka brings us Santa’s many observations, some about his job: “Wishes blowing in/from my overfilled mailbox–/December’s first storm” and others about the weather, the time of year, and Christmas preparations: “Clouds of reindeer breath/in the barn, steam rising from/my hot chocolate”. A fun read all at once, or one per day in anticipation of Christmas, some of the haiku work for winter in general as well: “Just after moonrise/I meet my tall, skinny twin–/’Good evening, shadow.’”

Kelly Ramsdell Fineman, Writing and Ruminating

Voices from the March on Washington
by J. Patrick Lewis and George Ella Lyon
Wordsong
Nominated by: Sylvia Vardell
Voices from the March is a historical novel in verse that focuses specifically on the momentous march on Washington, D.C. on August 28, 1963, where Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. gave his landmark “I Have a Dream” speech. Six fictional characters (young and old, black and white) tell their tales on this historic day in cycles of linked poems alongside the perspectives of historic figures and other march participants for a rich tapestry of multiple points of view. It’s been 50 years since the signing of the Civil Rights Act in 1964, when discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, or national origin became against the law. In this powerful work, Lewis and Lyon tackle issues of racial and social justice in 70 lyrical poems that reflect the perspectives of young people and adults struggling with taking action for positive change in peaceful ways. In addition, extensive and helpful back matter includes a guide to the fictional and historical voices, bibliography, index, and list of websites and related books.
Sylvia Vardell, Poetry for Children

Water Rolls, Water Rises Water Rolls, Water Rises: El agua rueda, el agua
sube
by Pat Mora
CBP
Nominated by: Sylvia Vardell
In a series of free verse poems in English and Spanish, our most precious natural resource takes center stage. Water rolls, rises, slithers, hums, twists, plunges, slumbers and moves across the Earth in varied forms and places. Mora’s three-line poems are filled with imagery and emotion. “Water rises/ into soft fog,/ weaves down the street, strokes and old cat.” (In Spanish: “El agua sube/ formando suave neblina/ que ondula pro la calle, acacia a un gate viejo.”) The lyrical movement of water described in verse is accompanied by Meilo So’s gorgeous mixed-media illustrations highlighting 16 landscapes from Iceland, to China, to Mexico, the United States and more. Back matter includes an author’s note and information about the images in the book. A joyous, bilingual celebration, this collection brings water to life.

Tricia Stohr-Hunt, The Miss Rumphius Effecto

Be reading this year and discovering new poetry titles to nominate for next year.
Happy Friday.
Happy Poetry.

Poetry Friday: That Time by Linda Baie

Poetry Friday is hosted by Irene Latham at Live Your Poem so be sure to hop on over and see all the wonderful poetry.

This summer I have participated in the Summer Poetry Swap, facilitated by Tabatha Yeatts.  Such great fun and it has pushed me.  Last week I received this poem from Linda Baie.

Jone

That Time

On summer afternoons, that shimmering sunshine
send playmates hurrying,
under the lilacs, into the shade.

Young girls in cotton dresses giggle,
as one brings out a Big Chief tablet and a pencil,
reporter in charge.

Each whispers a rule.
and promises a bond,
the first of many
among little girls.

Linda Baie, 2014© all rights reserved”

*(I realized the poem wasn’t showing well after I published the post so I included it for easier reading.)

I read this poem and wondered, “How did Linda know about my childhood?”  You see, I had a really good friend, her yard looked like the photo, and we did create and make-up stories.  Often about fairy tales and fairies.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

WANTED: Panelists and Judges for the CYBILS Poetry AWARDS!  More information HERE.

Google application HERE.

DEADLINE?  Friday, September 5, 2014.

Happy Friday.

Happy Poetry.

Poetry Friday: Poetry Pairing

20140313-194956.jpgThank you, Julie at  The Drift Record for hosting Poetry Friday.

Screen Shot 2014-03-03 at 11.32.43 AMWho hasn’t heard of this fabulous new anthology?

My school is currently finishing up reading the nominees for the Washington Children’s Choice Picture Book Award.

pve

I read the nominee,  Pluto Visits Earth by Steve Metzger, illustrations by Jared Lee last week. One of the students immediately recognized the art work as the guy who illustrates the Black Lagoon series by Mike Thaler.

Then students listened to this great poem from the Poetry Friday Anthology to pair with this book:

Uh, Oh Plutoby Jeannine Atkins

Once Pluto was proud to be called one of nine planets.But astronomers decided he was too small,
too far away from the Sun, made unpredictable orbits.
They tore pictures of poor Pluto off walls
and museum halls showed only eight planets.
Happily, Pluto found new friends, streaking balls
of rocks, dust, and ice called comets.
Orbiting whimsically together, Pluto is greatest of all.

Don’t forget to sign up of a Poetry Postcard.

Happy Friday.
Happy Poetry.