Celebrate: Five Star Things About the Week

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It’s time to celebrate all the goodness of the week. Share you celebrations at Ruth Ayres Writes.

ONE

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Students! One curled up in a corner reading. Another brought me poems she wrote in response to Susan Blackaby’s visit. She also told me that I have taught her so much. One more student thought I was a wizard on the computer as I quickly put his poem into the drop box so I could have it for the Poetry Postcard Project.

TWO

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Students illustrating their poems for the POetry Post Card Project. They are some of the best in the years I have been doing it.

THREE

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Drama club. This is us at last Saturday’s practice. I discovered this week that we will have over thirty hours of rehearsal when we perform in April.
The students need find their confidence of working off-script.

FOUR

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Voting. Students are voting for their favorite picture book. It’s the Washington Children’s Choice Picture Book Award. Indeed it will be their choice as my least favorite book is winning. Sigh, the power of the vote. However, they take the voting seriously and every book has at least one vote.

FIVE
Sharing a poem I was revising with a second grade class. It’s just so fun to go into a class and share work to get feedback. It was a pantoum and we talked about while I hate math, I am engaged in math when I write poetry.

What are you celebrating?

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Poetry Friday: Playing with Pantoums

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Poetry Friday is held at Mary Lee’s A Year of Reading.

Over at Deowriter, I wrote a poem about the moonrise. This week I have been rewriting some earlier poems into pantoums.

we waited for moonrise atop the roof
while the beets grew lesser moons below
in the garden soil we forgot to plow
stars flickered as we tried remembering

while the beets grew lesser moons below
And voles munched on tomato roots
stars flickered as we tried remembering
constellations as slugs harvested garden greens

And voles munched on tomato roots
we sang songs and counted
constellations as slugs harvested garden greens
shooting stars lit up the night sky

we sang songs and counted
in the garden soil we forgot to plow
shooting stars lit up the night sky
we waited for moonrise atop the roof

Beginning April 1, Thirty Days of Student Poetry will be featured on this blog for National Poetry Week.

Happy Friday.
Happy poetry.

Celebrate: Five Star Things About the Week

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It’s Saturday. Time to celebrate the goodness of the week. Visit Ruth Ayres Writes for more celebrations.
ONE

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This rainbow after a very long day on Thursday.

TWO
Fifth graders typing the poems of first and second graders for me. These are the poems from Susan Blackaby’s visit. The plan is to put them in a book.

THREE
Series books have been order for the grant I received. So has a new rug for the library.

Four
Over 150 poems were submitted to the Young Poets Digest, a part of the National Schools Writing Project.

Five
Spring is finally here! Enough said.

What are you celebrating?

Poetry Friday: Poetry Pairing

20140313-194956.jpgThank you, Julie at  The Drift Record for hosting Poetry Friday.

Screen Shot 2014-03-03 at 11.32.43 AMWho hasn’t heard of this fabulous new anthology?

My school is currently finishing up reading the nominees for the Washington Children’s Choice Picture Book Award.

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I read the nominee,  Pluto Visits Earth by Steve Metzger, illustrations by Jared Lee last week. One of the students immediately recognized the art work as the guy who illustrates the Black Lagoon series by Mike Thaler.

Then students listened to this great poem from the Poetry Friday Anthology to pair with this book:

Uh, Oh Plutoby Jeannine Atkins

Once Pluto was proud to be called one of nine planets.But astronomers decided he was too small,
too far away from the Sun, made unpredictable orbits.
They tore pictures of poor Pluto off walls
and museum halls showed only eight planets.
Happily, Pluto found new friends, streaking balls
of rocks, dust, and ice called comets.
Orbiting whimsically together, Pluto is greatest of all.

Don’t forget to sign up of a Poetry Postcard.

Happy Friday.
Happy Poetry.

It’s Monday; What Are You Reading?

 

Thanks to Teach Mentor Texts for providing a gathering place for readers.

+-+792672032_140I finished A Tangle of Knots by Lisa Graf. It’s a book that I need to reread.  I was reminded of Savvy by Ingrid Law.

It was a rather fun Sunday as my 9 YO grand girl finished her Meadows’ Fairy book and had her nose in Because of Winn Dixie.

Last week, I read the following books to K-3.  They are part of the 2014 Readers’ Choice Awards for Washington state:

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Pluto Visits Earth by Steve Metzger

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Out of This World by  Amy Sklansky

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Goldilocks and The Three Dinosaurs by Mo Willems

We vote next week on the twenty nominees. What are you reading?

Celebrate: Five Star Things About the Week

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Please see what others are celebrating at Ruth Ayre Writes.
ONE

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This sneak attack photo of a grandmother and granddaughter reader the school play script together.

TWO
Teaching third graders how to save a document. In the computer lab for the first time this year, they followed directions very well.

THREE
I am half way through the month of writing everyday at Deowriter for the Slice Of Life Story Challenge at Two Writing Teachers.

FOUR

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Bringing out the parachute at PreK Storytime. As you can see is was loads of fun.

FIVE
The response to the Poetry Postcard Project. Over sixty have signed up and there’s room for more. Please visit HERE to provide me with your snail mail details.

What are you celebrating?

Poetry Friday: “Sound Waves” by Amy VanDerwater

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On Wednesday, Amy stopped by to have tea and talk about her award winning book, FOREST HAS A SONG. Today she’s backed with a poem published in the POETRY FRIDAY ANTHOLOGY for SCIENCE.
Listen to Amy read her poem:

Sound Waves

If you have ever seen the ocean
throwing cold waves from her hand
pulling shells from mighty depths
tossing each upon wet sand,
you can understand how sound waves
move like water through dry air.
One-by-one, vibrations follow
pressing sounds from here-to-there.
Sounds can pass through liquids.
Through gases. Solids too.
But sounds waves moving through the air
are sound waves meant for you.
Violin or thunderstorm —
each will reach your waiting ear
to play upon a tiny drum.
This is how you hear.

© Amy Ludwig VanDerwater

Poetry Friday is held at Rogue Anthropologist. Thanks, Kara.

Happy Friday.
Happy Poetry.